couple on honeymoon road trip across US

1. Set a budget.

At first, planning a road trip honeymoon sounds like a budget-friendly venture. And while it certainly can be an affordable way to explore the U.S., you still have to set a budget. From accommodations and gas to Slurpees and truck stop sunglasses, you can start to blow through your honeymoon fund quickly. Before you decide on where to go, discuss how far you can afford to go. Figure out your vacation priorities (more on that below) so that your road trip honeymoon can fit your budget.

2. Select your priorities.

Maybe you two don't care if you have to sleep in your car every night so long as you make it all the way across the country. Or perhaps you don't mind only making it to the state line because you both agree you don't want to be in the car for more than 4 hours a day.  Whatever your priorities, make sure that you outline them in conjunction with your budget so that the two of you are aligned in your plans.

3. Give each other a break.

Most honeymooners get a break from each other, even if only for a few minutes here and there at the hotel.  But when you are on a honeymoon road trip, you two are stuck together in pretty close quarters for the majority of your time. No couple is immune to the petty arguments ("You want to listen to Taylor Swift again?") that can pop up in these circumstances. Make sure to give each other a bit of space when you can to avoid getting on each other's nerves. Take a walk at a rest stop.  Shop for candy at the gas station while he checks out the soda situation. These little moments by yourselves will give you just enough breathing room while still being on a romantic newlywed trip.

4. Play to your strengths.

Make sure you understand each other's travel personalities when you plan a honeymoon road trip.  If you love to take care of details, go mad with marking down well-reviewed hotels along your route and taking note of operating hours for all the attractions on your list.  If your partner prefers to be a little spontaneous, factor in time for unexpected detours and moments.  Good planning can save a trip, but fortuitous surprises are usually the best memories, so make sure to give both of your styles a chance.

5. Register for your road trip.

Just because you aren't flying to a far-flung locale doesn't mean you can't set up a honeymoon registry or ask for road trip-related gadgets.  A honeymoon registry can provide you with the funds to visit museums, eat at much-raved-about diners, purchase kitschy souvenirs, or even give you a AAA membership. If you are using a more traditional registry, consider adding items like portable phone batteries and sleeping bags to your list (you never know when that hotel is just too far to keep on driving).

For more help planning your U.S. road trip, head here!