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Especially when you are taking a traditional honeymoon rather than a weekend mini-moon, knowing your travel "personality" is key to your vacation's success. Are you the person armed with the map, or the one basking in the sun at the hotel pool?  Whether you and your new spouse have traveled together before or this is a first-time experience, here is a guide to find out what you expect from your honeymoon and how you contribute!

The Planner

Your phone is loaded with review and navigation apps and you never leave home without it. Your friends always trust you to know all the shortcuts on road trips and frequently rely on your maven-level research skills. A big part of the joy of traveling for you is in the preparation--finding the best hotel, creating a packed itinerary of the coolest places to go, and making sure your suitcase is packed and prepared for every occasion.

How to help:  Of course, be you and plan like a boss.  Your honey will love sitting back and letting you do all the research.

What to avoid:  Don't completely overtake this trip. Make sure you both want a busy honeymoon filled with destinations to visit before scheduling every last second.

Ideal Location: Places that offer a wide range of activities like Los Angeles, New York, and Vancouver, B.C.

The Adapter

You truly don't care where you go to eat, much to the chagrin of your spouse, who just wants you to pick a restaurant. But the fact of the matter is that you care more about the company you are with than what's on tap for the day. You adapt to any situation, and are generally very easygoing.  Truth be told, you're going to be content no matter what your honeymoon looks like.

How to help: Pick at least one thing that is important for you to do on your honeymoon. Maybe it's simply a whole day reading books on the beach. But claiming something will help put your partner at ease.

What to avoid: Sometimes really adaptable people can be prone to passive-aggression because they often are doing what others want.  Make sure to communicate well on your trip to avoid feeling taken advantage of.

Ideal Location: Relaxed environments that will allow you to go with the flow, such as Hawaii, Vermont, and Puerto Vallarta.

The Cheesy Tourist

Whenever you visit a new town, the tourist traps call your name. You have no qualms about looking like a total out-of-towner.  From amusement parks to Segway tours, you just can't help yourself.  So, it comes as no surprise when planning your trip you find yourself drooling over all of the souvenir-laden shops and caricature stands.

How to help: If your spouse is a bit uptight when it comes to preferred vacay activities, you can loosen them up and show them it is okay to let loose.

What to avoid: Seriously, do you need to go on the dinner cruise and the harbor tour?  Be willing to do what your partner wants too--even if it isn't your bag.

Ideal Location: A cruise will provide you with all of the fun activities and teach you how to relax a little.

The Relaxer

For you, weekends are about recovering from the busy week work.  Most likely you are also a bit of an introvert who needs serious downtime to recharge when you have a packed schedule.  More than just about anything, you really value vacation time.  You are absolutely, positively, militantly against doing anything when you travel.  Your goal is to come back utterly rested and ready to take on "reality" again.

How to help:  Your fellow honeymooner may not fully appreciate the art of just being. Show them how to unwind properly--no itinerary required.

What to avoid: Unless you have married your travel doppelganger, they might want to venture beyond the beach.  It's all about compromise!

Ideal Location: Find peaceful accommodations, but in a vibrant area, such as Italy, St. Lucia, or Thailand.

Photography   |   Lauren Kelley Photography