LazyDog Honey

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PO Box 1503
Frankfort, KY 40602 United States

+1 502 320-6577

Pure, Raw and Local
Though the dog may be lazy, the bees stay quite busy and produce a high quality honey from the nectars of the Bluegrass Region of Central Kentucky.

The winter of 2011-2012 was very mild and the colonies held their own and had a rapid build up timed
with the early spring in the Midwest.  As result the bees were prepared for the early nectar flow and the production of early spring honey was exceptional - both in terms of volume and quality. Though we expect perhaps 40-60 pounds of harvested honey from a typical hive, some of the more mature hives produced as much as 100 pounds and were still at it when a very sharp increase of temperatures brought a halt to the nectar flow in late June and early July.


The bees forage from a dozen or more bee yards dispersed throughout Central Kentucky surrounding the state Capital, Frankfort. The location of each bee yard relative to woodland, cropland, open meadows, the Kentucky River and its bottom lands as well as rural settlements produce a wide array of very local honey.
 
Each of the bee yards are harvested and processed separately, retaining the distinctive flavor and aroma profiles of the individual yard, its geography, microclimate and other factors. Though we can’t claim the honey is organic, we add neither chemicals nor antibiotics to the hives. We feed the bees in the spring and fall but insure that the honey supers are removed during those times. This practice insures that only natural honey reaches the comb we harvest from the spring, summer and early fall honey flows. As a family owned operation, we let the bees do the work and beyond mechanically filtering the harvest, the product is theirs: raw, pure and local.

 I have always thought of myself as a bee tender - not a beekeeper.  As nature would have it, the bees are independent and will not be "kept" should they choose otherwise.  As such, we do best by selecting bee yard sites that are favorable for the hive colonies to flourish; have access to nectar and pollen producing trees and flowers; are proximate to fresh water, and are sheltered from the brisk winds of winter and summer storms.  We attempt to protect the hives from four legged marauders and must resign ourselves to the vagaries of weather cycles, whether it be heat or cold, draught or rain and snow.
 
 
 
 
 
 

Lazy Dog Honey

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Our Honey
(Pure, Raw and Local)

Spring and Summer 2012


BlueGrass Blend

This spring honey is a blend of honey extracted from multiple beeyards located in multiple counties within the central Kentucky Blue Grass region.

Much of the honey comes from established hives, though the blend will occasionally include small amounts of honey from newly established hives including, this year, hives in the Peaks Mill area of Franklin County and Lovers Leap Vineyards in Anderson County.

As a result of a mild winter and early spring the honey production began with an early and extended wild flower and black locust nectar flows and pollen collection. Periodic rains and warm (but not hot) weather extended the nectar collection and somewhat slowed the drying and capping of the finished honey in the hive. The spring season was an exact opposite of the previous (and difficult 2011) spring. The Lazy Dog jumped in and accompanied the early harvest beginning Memorial Day weekend and extending through the transit of Venus and the 9th of June. He recalled that this was three weeks earlier than our usual first harvest in central Kentucky.  

As a result, the honey in this blend is true to the character of an early spring honey; light in color, delicate flavors and aroma and less viscous than the summer honey’s to follow. The bees drew early from a wide range of spring flowering trees, including a magnificent black locust bloom. The light nectar was mixed (in many instances by the bees in the hives) with nectar from white clover and an early blackberry bloom near many of the yards.


Kentuckiana Blend

This honey is a regional blend of honey extracted from multiple beeyards located in multiple counties within the Kentucky BlueGrass and Southern Indiana, during the summer and early fall.

Much of the honey comes from established hives, though the blend will occasionally include small amounts of honey from newly established hives from the BlueGrass region.  In addition, we have included honey from the southern Indiana beeyards of Hollow Log Apiaries, based in Vallonia, Indiana.
 
As a result of the early spring and the preceding heavy fall nectar flow in Kentucky, the Lazy Dog was able to harvest early and combine the bees' labors in both the fall of 2011 and the spring of 2012 producing a robust spring harvested honey.  Nectar collection in the spring was dominated by early wildflowers and black locust and the fall’s nectar of aster, golden rod and other wildflowers that resulted in a honey of bolder flavor than typical of a spring harvest.

Though the honey in this blend was harvested during May and it is closer to the character of a summer honey; more viscous, light amber in color and rich in flavors. The bees drew early from a wide range of vegetation common to the Kentuckiana landscape - providing an excellent cross section of pollen for those who suffer from Ohio -Kentucky River allergies.
 

Micro-climate  Spring Harvests

For those of you who have an interest in honey produced in a specific geography of central Kentucky, we will offer several this spring.  They include three micro-climates in Franklin County and one in Anderson County.  In Franklin County they include bee yards located near the Forks of Elkhorn (NE Franklin County), two yards in the Peaks Mill area (Central) and several yards proximate to Grindstone Creek (Central adjacent to Kentucky River).  The Anderson County bee yards are located in northern portion of the County at Lovers Leap Vineyard.  Other micro-climate honey may become available later in the summer.  Please inquire on availability and pricing as quantities are limited.


Summer Harvest Honey

The prognosis for summer blends is uncertain art this time, both for the Bluegrass and Kentuckiana. Our principal hesitation is the heat wave that started in late June and persists as this update is posted on the 2nd of July.  Relief is still at least a week away.  As the heat moved into the Midwest, the colonies still had substantial amounts of uncapped honey to harvest. However if the heat persists as well as the draught, the bees may need to feed on these supplies as nectar sources wither.  


Cinnamon Spiced Honey

Who would have ever guessed that the Lazy Dog harbored well-developed culinary skills?

This summer honey was blended and mechanically filtered before introducing Sri Lankan cinnamon and essential oil.  The spicy sweetness and aroma of the cinnamon is infused in the honey by a process developed by the Lazy Dog, that insures the maturation of aroma and flavors without harm to the honey.  The cinnamon adds its own sweet flavor and distinctive aroma.

The Lazy Dog first used this blend on his morning cereal, drizzling it over his raisin bran and corn chex.  If cereal, why not rice cakes?  Or pancakes?  But why stop there?  Then there was peanut butter, banana and cinnamon honey on whole wheat bread for lunch, then there was the late afternoon snack of French vanilla ice cream drizzled with cinnamon infused honey.  Of course it was used as a sweetener in tea and coffee and for dinner - and well space doesn’t permit listing his options for use with dinner.


Clove Spiced Honey

This summer honey was blended and mechanically filtered before introducing whole Indonesian cloves and essential oils.  The spicy aroma and flavor of the cloves are infused in the honey by a process developed by the Lazy Dog, that insures the maturation of aroma and flavors without harm to the honey.  The cloves add depth of flavor and spice, as well as their distinctive aroma.

The Lazy Dog first used this concoction as an ingredient to a sweet and spicy barbeque sauce that called for sugar or corn syrup. Given that success, he’s been non-stop with new ideas.  He suggests that you use it as a glaze for roast chicken, lamb or pork.  Alternatively, try drizzling it on goat or another favorite cheese.  It will dress up a salad, add sweetness to baked beans, and if you have a penchant for Indian foods, too many choices.  And for those who take honey in your coffee, tea or chai...need we say more?


Advisory

Infants up to one year of age should not be fed raw honey, as their immune systems are not yet developed enough to fend off a normally benign strain of bacteria, C. botulinum.

Unlike highly processed honey, raw honey is predisposed to crystallization in the jar - a condition that can be simply remedied by warming the bottle in a pot of water on the stove or by microwaving for 30-60 seconds several  times at medium heat with the lid loosened.  By keeping the temperature of the honey below 105  degrees (F) no harm will occur to the natural enzymes and flavors.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Though the dog may be lazy, the bees produce a high quality honey. The location of each bee yard imparts the honey with distinctive flavor, color and aroma profiles. As a family owned operation, we let the bees do the work and beyond custom packaging the harvest, the product is theirs: raw, pure and local.