All you brides out there with months and months to plan?  This one isn't for you.  This post is for the brave brides who just got engaged and are planning a July wedding. The ones who when faced with the idea of waiting a year for their dream summer wedding, scoffed and said, "No,thankyouverymuch."  When you are planning a wedding in less than a few months, your planning priorities change. Here are 5 tips for planning a wedding when you chose to have a short engagement.

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1. Set a budget and list of top priorities and stick to it.

All brides have to do this, but for you ladies on a limited time frame, it is even more important. Wedding planning is a virtual minefield of distractions. One minute you'll be doing research on where to find a wedding dress in your city, and the next thing you realize, you're looking at DIY napkin rings and two hours have passed.  The two of you need to discuss what are the absolutely most important things to have at your wedding. For some couples, they need a band because everyone in their family loves to dance. For others, they could care less about the entertainment but good food is a non-negotiable.  Decide what you both value, and move forward with those plans in mind.

2. When it comes to good, fast, and cheap, pick two.

There's an old adage that basically states that when it comes to selecting goods and services you can only have two of these three things. Having all three is pretty much impossible.  So if you are on a limited budget and schedule, you should expect that your wedding details might not be of the highest quality.  Likewise, if quality is your non-negotiable, expect to pay more for faster service.  Both of these options are just fine and should be expected when you are planning a wedding this quickly. But it's always good to have realistic expectations at the outset of planning.

3. Learn to delegate wisely and well.

You are going to need help with all of this. Especially when friends and family volunteer, accept graciously and take them up on their offer. When it comes to delegating, ask people to do things they are naturally gifted at or will enjoy. Their task will be done more efficiently and pleasantly than if you have assigned them something they have no skill or interest in. Also, you probably think it goes without saying how grateful you are for their assistance. It doesn't.  Thank them often. Although grooms often think that wedding planning isn't in their wheelhouse, your fella is going to have to get over that. Put him in charge of anything to do with his family or groomsmen, as well as any other planning details.

4. Don't get weighed down by details.

Especially with others helping you, there are a lot of tiny details that you might need to let go of. Do you absolutely need a creative place setting, or are classic white linens just fine?  Baby's breath or greenery with the roses in the aisle decor?  Passed appetizers or small bites buffet?  Weddings are filled with laundry lists of decisions that are pretty much designed to make you insane. When you delegate, that means relinquishing control. Before you ask someone to do something, make sure that you are okay with whatever they complete. You don't have time to nitpick, so pick all battles very carefully.

5. You might get more "regrets" than expected.

If you are getting married last-minute during the summer, you may receive back more "regrets" on your RSVP cards than you expected. Couples getting married during the summer have been sending out their save-the-dates for months. So, your guests might be already committed to attending another event. Don't be offended. This is simply par for the course when planning a wedding quickly.  Roll with it and try to get your RSVPs back as soon as possible so that you can secure the appropriate number for your wedding vendors.

 

Photography   |   Matthew Speck Photography