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Help other brides out.

Your wedding is done. You're back from your honeymoon. With a stack of unwritten thank you notes in front of you and a married "routine" to map out, you don't exactly need one more thing to do. But flashback to you a year ago, when you sat at your computer absolutely clueless about where to begin and who to hire. If you ever used a wedding vendor review, then it's time to pay it forward to the next bride.

Be reasonable and objective.

It's self-awareness time, people. When you write a review it is often as much about your expectations as it is about the vendor's performance. For example, let's say that you were a bride that preferred a lot of communication and contact. You called your wedding planner at least once a day during a particularly stressful month. If she didn't return every phone call, it's probably not fair to say that she was flaky. Instead, write that if a bride needs a lot of contact and support, this may not be the vendor for them.

Point out specific examples.

Whether your review is a rave or rant, it's important to be specific. Give tangible, relatable examples as to why you would or wouldn't recommend their services. If your photographer was two hours late to your wedding, point that out. If your wedding planner went above and beyond by coaching your maid of honor through her fear of public speaking, mention it. Because calling your caterer the "best caterer ever" is very sweet, but it probably isn't going to assist other brides in determining if that vendor is right for them.

Make sure to mention if you would hire them again.

Wedding vendors rely on great reviews because they enable them to get even more exposure from "word of mouth" recommendations. If you were going to distill a review down to one central message, it's whether or not you would hire them again. Again, provide specific examples, but do what you can to emphasize this point. For example, perhaps you loved what your florist created, but she went way over budget and had a difficult personality. In this situation, would you still want to work with that vendor again? Even if your wedding vendor review is full of both pros and cons, conclude with whether or not you would hire them for a future event.

Edit to ensure that your review is actually helpful.

The best reviews are well-edited, concise, and clearly worded. Typing in all caps usually just makes you look insane, rather than helping you make your point. Write it out and then take a day before you post it. Perhaps even ask your spouse or best friend to look it over and see if your review is accurate and compelling. Every wedding vendor has experienced both good and bad reviews. Either way, they will respect your review if it is fair. And wedding planning brides will certainly appreciate your efforts!