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Brides get a bad rap in movies, TV shows, and the like—it seems as if they're always showing up late to the altar! It's the guests that you should really be worried about, and that's especially true if you've got family or friends who live chronically behind schedule. How can you prevent exchanging vows in front of a ceremony space speckled with empty seats? Or worse, having the proceedings held up by tardy members of the wedding party? Here, we share our tips, because your wedding should wait for no one (and the last thing you need are vendors peeved by a thrown-off timeline).

HOW TO KEEP GUESTS INFORMED ABOUT IMPORTANT WEDDING DETAILS

Make the Time Known

Obviously, you're going to include the time of your wedding on your invitations. But it doesn't hurt to go the extra mile by putting it elsewhere, as well, like on your wedding website. You can bold it, underline it, write it in a bright color, or do whatever else you deem necessary to emphasize it too.

Take a Direct Route

If there's someone in particular you're stressed about, consider confronting them directly. If you feel uncomfortable taking on the task yourself, delegate it to your parents, the maid of honor, or someone close to the guest who's also invited (like their date or a mutual friend). If you're trying to be less obvious, push for the Royal Highness of Lateness to travel in a pack. Make an excuse for why you want guests to arrive in groups (less traffic, perhaps?) and ensure that there's at least one punctual person in the bunch to keep everybody else on track.

Give Them Resources

While it shouldn't have to be your responsibility to get grown adults to show up on time, it's probably in your best interest to give them as many tools as possible to make it happen. That means suggesting modes of transportation (like local, reliable cab services), providing maps (they're great in welcome bags), or anything else that can prevent hold-ups.