Trademark Fine Art

Trademark Fine Art Jibaro Bajo La Luna by Oscar Ortiz, 18x24

AMAZON

Trademark Fine Art Jibaro Bajo La Luna by Oscar Ortiz, 18x24

This ready to hang, gallery-wrapped art piece features a character holding a guitar over a blue sky. Prominent Colors: Teal, Blue, Black, Brown, Tan, Green Oscar Ortiz was born in Manhattan, New York, USA in 1964. He started painting and selling his pieces back in 2002. Eventually he moved into selling prints and licensing his art internationally. His paintings have graced calendars, CDs, magazines, posters and others. Organizations, like UNESCO, have used his imagengs have graced calendars, CDs, magazines, posters and others. Organizations, like UNESCO, have used his images for several purposes. Among his most recent projects are illustrating an award winning children book, "The Poet Upstairs” (published by Arte Publico) and a text book for National Geographic Learning. The artist’s paintings are executed in different mediums such as oil, alkyd, casein, acrylics, colored pencils, inks and mixed media. Oscar is sought after and celebrated throughout the world for his bright but controlled Caribbean colors. “Happy", "exciting", "peaceful” and “energetic” are common adjectives expressed by his collectors when describing his artwork. Whether at home or abroad, Oscar drinks fresh brewed black coffee at 3 PM or so as his favorite method of staying rooted with his Puerto Rican upbringing. He is still dating his High School sweet heart after marrying her in 1986. As a person, Oscar holds an unblemished record of imperfection. A half way done painting makes it all better. Giclee (jee-clay) is an advanced printmaking process for creating high quality fine art reproductions. The attainable excellence that Giclee printmaking affords makes the reproduction virtually indistinguishable from the original piece. The result is wide acceptance of Giclee by galleries, museums, and private collectors. Gallery wrap is a method of stretching an artist's canvas so that the canvas wraps around the sides and is secured a hidden, wooden frame. This method of stretching and preparing a canvas allows for a frameless presentation of the finished painting. read more